Rumki Chowdhury
Rumki Chowdhury

ONLINE ASSISTANT EDITOR FOR HAYATI MAGAZINE, PUBLISHED AUTHOR, POET AND JOURNALIST WITH AN MA IN ENGLISH LITERATURE. BORN IN BANGLADESH, RAISED IN USA, LIVED AND STUDIED IN UK AND NOW, AN ENGLISH TEACHER IN SWEDEN. ALSO, MARRIED AND MOTHER OF THREE DAUGHTERS.

Aurora Hijabs By Kaya

Inspired by others women’s stories and her own personal life journey, Kaya Gravitter is the designer and founder of Aurora Hijabs. Here she talks about her journey to connecting hijab to the fashion world and vice versa as well as what makes Aurora Hijabs a unique hijab brand:

“Wear What When!” The Book

Hanifah Ashry is the author of “Wear What When,” the ultimate fashion rule book and guide for those of you struggling to find your own personal style. It is especially targeted toward hijabi fashion and modest attire. Let’s find out about this author and her book:

Divinity and Nature Drive Nadia

My work is a combination of my feelings, philosophies and thoughts on canvas.  The predominant themes I focus on revolve around the philosophy of religion, interfaith harmony and exploration of the Quran. 

What others tell me is that my art belongs in the Contemporary Islamic Art niche. I think I have established my own unique style within that niche experimenting with modern, abstract and even traditional styles at times. 

Culture and Faith Swirl Around in Hajra’s Art

Hajra Motiwala art is a collection of layers portraying her culture and faith. The layering effect highlights her golden culture in marble-like swirls and the Arabic texts top it all off. Her aesthetics vary from the abstract to the defined and is an imminent example of how she leads her own life. She considers art a part of her life, not just in painting it, but in living it:

“My Hair is Pink Under This Veil” Says Rabina

Rabina Khan’s “My Hair is Pink Under This Veil” is out TODAY, the 20th of May, 2021. It is a personal memoir ranging from the journey to wearing the veil, tackling the misconceptions and prejudices after having worn it, to the politics surrounding it around the world. “My Hair is Pink Under This Veil” is an open and bold plethora of real life experiences that relates to everything and anything that has to to with the veil or hijab; it even addresses issues that most people may find too controversial for conversation, the “let’s not get in too deep” kind. That is why we need a book like this on every bookshelf; it’s a book that will stir up discussions that most choose to avoid, but NEED to have! 

“Mundo Abesitos” Handbags

Iman Assaf Casals is a mother who has a Masters in biochemistry, but has discovered her love for the sewing machine, particularly when it comes to creating bag designs! In this interview, she tells us about how her business, “Mundo Abesitos” began, her ups and downs, what she has learned from it and of course, her beautiful bag designs:

Uzma: Owning Her Identity Through Her Books

Uzma Jalaluddin is a published author of two books: “Ayesha At Last” and “Hanna Khan Carries On,” both a means through which Uzma owns her identity. Look out for “Hanna Khan Carries” on, release date April 13, 2021 (available for preorder). Through her books, Uzma aims to instill pride and motivation in one’s own identity, particularly those who have yearned to see a Muslim as the main character in a book. Having grown up in Canada and within a Muslim, South Asian community, Uzma also writes for the parenting column in The Toronto Star Newspaper and has had her byline in The Atlantic. Here is her story on how she came into writing, what void she felt needed to be filled in the book market , her books and on who she is:

Normalizing Black Muslims Stories

As a young girl, published author Rahma Mohamed moved with her family from Somalia to Canada where she struggled with learning a new language but eventually tackled it and became an avid reader, writer and today, a published author, publisher and TedEx speaker. Her mission? “Normalizing Black Muslim Stories.” Read how:

A Prolific Author “Without Trepidation”

Sahar Abdulaziz is a gifted and prolific author whose collection of published books travel across a broad range of genres, themes and plots in the form of both individual and series. She is an author of eleven books––including The Broken Half, As One Door Closes, Expendable, Tight Rope, Unlikely Friends, Devoted Friends, The Gatekeeper’s Notebook, and her latest release, Unexpected Friends. Her work of fiction highlights the core of very realistic issues and challenges from domestic violence, mental health to romance. She is eloquent, مَا شَاءَ ٱللَّٰهُ and my favorite quote of hers from my interview with her is, “I believe my responsibility as a writer lies in telling the stories that need to be told without trepidation.”

From Bold Theatrics, Daring to be Artistic

Swedish Iranian artist, Shama Vafaipour, takes us on her journey from being an actress to becoming an artist! She decided to be bold, take chances and leap into her most inner self, only to reveal it to the world through Sweden’s biggest theatrical stages and later, through her art. Shama uses different artistic techniques including illumination art, using pure gold powder, to digital art and photography! I recently attended her exhibit at Kista Galleria where I admired how she incorporated her vibrant and colorful culture into her artwork:

Her Life in Prose

She writes her life in the form of prose. Although we can say that poetry, in general, is the unveiling of one’s most inner self, Amerah Saleh writes her autobiography in the form of poems in her book, “I am not from Here.” This unique technique truly moves the reader just as prose and rythm normally do, but with a mixture of the speaker’s (poet’s) recollection of the past that has shaped her into who she is today. See interview below:

Breaking Cultural Barriers, One Word at a Time

If I could describe Nazhah Khawaja, I would say that if you are a woman, she is standing up for YOU. I was just speaking to my cousin the other day about how we need a South Asian author who publishes a book about cultural barriers, that we felt it needed to be broken. When it comes to Islam, there are so many spiritual/religious rights for women, but a culture with a patriarchal society puts a barrier up against it. Nazhah found her own way of breaking that barrier in both her personal life and in the publishing industry. For her bravery, my cousin and I applaud her as she did something we have been struggling to do…speaking openly about these cultural barriers or patriarchal society. Nazhah is a single mother and a author of a fictitious story based on realistic and relatable issues entitled, “The Other Side of Life.” Here is her inspiring story: